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Ativan

The widespread availability of drugs such as Ativan has made them common as drugs of addiction. Most people who take Ativan take it responsibly; however, the nonmedical use or abuse of Ativan and other prescription medications remains a serious public health concern. Long-term users typically develop a tolerance to the drugs, requiring larger doses to achieve the desired effects. A psychological and/or physical dependence can develop, making it difficult to discontinue use. Some individuals who abuse prescription medication such as Ativan take it to bring them down after using stimulants such as ecstasy or cocaine. Others take them to enhance the effects of alcohol. They are also commonly used as replacement drugs when a user's drug of first choice is not available.

Ativan has a high potential for addiction. Ativan can cause psychological and physical addiction. Individuals develop an addiction to Ativan because it produces feelings of well-being. Once an individual has moved from abusing Ativan and developed an addiction to Ativan they will often get multiple prescriptions from different doctors to support their addiction. Ativan activates the brain's reward systems. The promise of reward is very intense, causing the individual to crave more Ativan and to focus his or her activities around taking the drug. The ability of Ativan to strongly activate brain reward mechanisms and its ability to chemically alter the normal functioning of these systems is what produces an addiction to Ativan. Ativan also reduce a person's level of consciousness, harming the ability to think or be fully aware of present surroundings.

"About 70 percent of Americans - approximately 191 million people - visit a health care provider, such as a primary care physician, at least once every 2 years. Thus, health care providers are in a unique position not only to prescribe needed medications appropriately, but also to identify prescription drug abuse when it exists and help the patient recognize the problem, set goals for recovery, and seek appropriate treatment when necessary. Screening for any type of substance abuse can be incorporated into routine history taking with questions about what prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines the patient is taking and why. Screening also can be performed if a patient presents with specific symptoms associated with problem use of a substance.

Over time, providers should note any rapid increases in the amount of a medication needed - which may indicate the development of tolerance - or frequent requests for refills before the quantity prescribed should have been used. They should also be alert to the fact that those addicted to prescription medications may engage in "doctor shopping," moving from provider to provider in an effort to get multiple prescriptions for the drug they abuse. Preventing or stopping prescription drug abuse is an important part of patient care. However, health care providers should not avoid prescribing or administering strong CNS depressants and painkillers, if they are needed. " (The National Institute on Drug Abuse)

Ativan Withdrawal

Ativan is the brand name for Lorazepam, an anti-anxiety agent. Ativan is a benzodiazepine and mild tranquilizer, sedative, and central nervous system (CNS) depressant. Ativan is very addictive. Ativan can cause psychological and physical addiction. Individuals develop an addiction to Ativan because it produces feelings of well-being. Once an individual has developed an addiction to Ativan they will often get multiple prescriptions from different doctors to support their addiction. Ativan activates the brain's reward systems. The promise of reward is very intense, causing the individual to crave more Ativan and to focus his or her activities around taking the drug. The ability of Ativan to strongly activate brain reward mechanisms and its ability to chemically alter the normal functioning of these systems is what produces an addiction to Ativan. Ativan also reduce a person's level of consciousness, harming the ability to think or be fully aware of present surroundings.

Withdrawal symptoms, similar in character to those noted with barbiturates and alcohol have occurred following abrupt discontinuance of Ativan. The more severe withdrawal symptoms have usually been limited to those patients who received excessive doses over an extended period of time.

Ativan Withdrawal symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • insomnia
  • ringing in the ears
  • shaking
  • tremors
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • convulsions
  • abdominal and muscle cramps
  • vomiting

Ativan Overdose

Ativan is the brand name for Lorazepam, an anti-anxiety agent. Ativan is a benzodiazepine and mild tranquilizer, sedative, and central nervous system (CNS) depressant. Ativan is manufactured in pill form as well as liquid form for injection. Ativan is very addictive and can cause psychological and physical dependence.

An Ativan overdose happens when you consume more Ativan than your body can safely handle. Ativan abusers are constantly flirting with drug overdose, and the difference between the high they're seeking and serious injury or death is often quite small. The symptoms of Ativan overdose are degrees of central nervous system depression ranging from drowsiness to coma.

In mild cases, symptoms include:

  • drowsiness
  • mental confusion
  • lethargy
  • weakness
  • unsteady walk
  • depressed breathing
  • stupor

In more serious cases, and especially when other drugs or alcohol were ingested, symptoms may include:

  • ataxia
  • hypotonia
  • hypotension
  • hypnotic state
  • stage one (1) to three (3) coma
  • death

Ativan Side Effects

Ativan is the brand name for Lorazepam, an anti-anxiety agent. Ativan is a benzodiazepine and mild tranquilizer, sedative, and central nervous system (CNS) depressant. Ativan is manufactured in pill form as well as liquid form for injection. There are many side effects that come with the use and abuse of Ativan, they included but are not limited to: clumsiness, dizziness, sleepiness, unsteadiness, weakness, amnesia, insomnia, agitation, disorientation, depression, headache, visual problems, nausea, abdominal discomfort, drowsiness, blurred vision, tachycardia, weakness, disinhibition (where they act inappropriately grandiose or out-of-control), anterograde amnesia (decreased or lack of recall of events during period of drug action) has been reported after administration of Ativan and appears to be dose-related, injectable Ativan results in an increased incidence of sedation, hallucination, and irrational behavior, some patients on Ativan have developed leukopenia, both elevation and lowering of blood sugar levels have been reported.

Ativan side effects include but are not limited to:

  • memory functioning is markedly and measurably impaired
  • ability to store acquired knowledge into long-term memory
  • acute amnesia

This memory impairment is highly relevant to students. The risk of acute amnesia is more pronounced with short-acting drugs. Ativan (lorazepam), Halcion (triazolam), Xanax (alprazolam) and Rohypnol (flunitrazepam) are especially likely to induce such memory impairment.