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Dexedrine

Dexedrine addiction is no different from alcoholism or an addiction to any other substance. However, no one is prescribed alcohol or cocaine for medical reasons. Many individuals who abuse stimulant medication such as Dexedrine find that they become dependent on the drug. Their reason for use becomes a need; they feel they need the medication to get by in their day to day lives.

While it is true that the drugs themselves are highly addictive, not everyone who takes Dexedrine becomes an addict. Drug tolerance is basically the body's ability to adapt to the presence of a drug. When narcotic substances are taken regularly for a length of time, the body does not respond to them as well. Tolerance then becomes defined as a state of progressively decreased responsiveness to a drug as a result of which a larger dose of the drug is needed to achieve the effect originally obtained by a smaller dose.

There is a difference between Dexedrine dependence and addiction. Dexedrine dependence occurs when tolerance builds up and the body needs the drug in order to function. Withdrawal symptoms will begin if the drug is stopped abruptly. On the other hand, when a person is dependent on the regular use of Dexedrine to satisfy physical, emotional, and psychological needs, they are addicted to Dexedrine. Physical dependence exists as well, but the drug has become a way to cope with all kinds of uncomfortable feelings.

Many prescription drug addicts do begin by needing the drug they are prescribed for medical reasons. Somewhere along the line, however, the drug begins to take over their lives and becomes more important than anything else. Nothing will stop them from getting their drug of choice.

It may be difficult to understand how someone could let this happen. How could someone who is reasonably intelligent and sophisticated in regards to drug addiction become an addict? Addiction has nothing to do with intelligence. And addiction to prescription drugs is no different than any other substance abuse problem. Many people in the medical profession abuse prescription drugs. Health care providers may have a slightly higher rate of addiction due to both the stressful nature of the work and their relatively easy access to supplies of narcotics. Clearly, the potential risks and dangers involved with taking narcotics are not unknown among health care providers. This, however, doesn't stop someone from becoming an addict.

Along with addiction, there are addictive behaviors that are quite common among Dexedrine addicts such as lying, keeping secrets, hiding pills and obsessively counting them, making unnecessary emergency room visits and constantly "doctor shopping." As the addiction escalates, engaging in such illegal activities as stealing prescription pads, committing forgery, and buying drugs off the street is also quite common behavior.

Dexedrine Withdrawal

Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) is an amphetamine, belonging to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants it is a Schedule II controlled substance. Dexedrine was often used in the late 60s and early 70s as a prescription diet aid, because one of the effects of such stimulant drugs is to suppress appetite. Dexedrine (and its more potent cousin Benzedrine) was also commonly (and illegally) used by college students, either for the stimulant high it provided or as a study aid. Dexedrine is highly addictive. Individuals form an addiction to Dexedrine due to its ability to sustain energy and lose weight. Dexedrine addiction may lead to serious complications such as increased heart rate and blood pressure.

Withdrawal symptoms from Dexedrine are characterized by depression and extreme fatigue. Fortunately, the withdrawal symptoms tend to be mostly psychological and not medical.

Dexedrine Withdrawal symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • fatigue
  • long but disturbed sleep
  • strong hangover
  • irritability
  • depression
  • violence
  • Dexedrine Overdose

    Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) is an amphetamine, belonging to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants. Dexedrine is a Schedule II controlled substance. Dexedrine was often used in the late 60s and early 70s as a prescription diet aid, because one of its effects appetite suppression. Today Dexedrine and its more potent cousin Benzedrine are also commonly (and illegally) used by college students, either for the stimulant high it provides or as a study aid.

    Dexedrine's overdose symptoms are listed below:

  • abdominal cramps
  • coma
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • depression
  • diarrhea
  • fatigue
  • hallucinations
  • high fever
  • heightened reflexes
  • high or low blood pressure
  • irregular heartbeat
  • nausea
  • panic
  • rapid breathing
  • restlessness
  • tremor
  • vomiting
  • death
  • Dexedrine Side Effects

    Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) is an amphetamine, belonging to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants it is a Schedule II controlled substance. Dexedrine was often used in the late 60s and early 70s as a prescription diet aid, because one of the effects of such stimulant drugs is to suppress appetite. Dexedrine (and its more potent cousin Benzedrine) was also commonly (and illegally) used by college students, either for the stimulant high it provided or as a study aid.

    Dexedrine side effects include but are not limited to:

  • addiction
  • agitation/irritability
  • insomnia
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • nausea
  • weight loss
  • hallucinations
  • liver irritation/toxicity
  • increased heart rate
  • tics
  • Tourette's syndrome
  • sexual difficulties
  • behavior disturbance
  • elevation of blood pressure
  • over stimulation
  • restlessness
  • dizziness
  • euphoria
  • headache
  • exacerbation of motor skills
  • diarrhea
  • constipation